Idle thoughts

I’ve had a few thoughts swarming my brain, so I thought I’d jot them down.

Have you ever watched a conversation between one of those people who talks without pause (indeed, without even breathing), and a person who interrupts compulsively? It’s part painful, part humorous. Incidentally, the hands-down winner in this conversational battle is the talker. The interrupter is simply left fulminating.

I am living proof that the “eat less, exercise more” rule can’t beat back genetics. No matter that I’m eating well, and exercising regularly, I can’t change the genetic destiny that says that, now that I’ve had children, I’ll have my mother’s figure and never again be rail thin. Sigh….

Speaking of genetic destiny, do you think it can be genetic destiny to break your toes? I broke most of my toes when I was young in various accidents where I slammed into walls and stairs. Today my daughter slammed her foot into the riser on our wooden stairs. We’re adopting a wait and see, but we’re pretty sure something is broken in there. Normally, it wouldn’t be a big deal, but since we’re leaving on a trip, I may find myself trotting off to the doctor’s tomorrow. Sigh…. Actually, I suspect the real genetic problem isn’t weak toes, but (a) weak eyesight and (b) a tendency to rush around without looking. Sigh, again….

My children have an awful habit of ignoring me completely, whether it’s because they’re so focused on playing with each other or on the mischief occupying them at any given moment. It infuriates me. I think I may have finally gotten through to them, though, by pointing out that it infuriates their friends too, and may account for the fact that all of their friends, without exception, have been blowing a bit cool towards them for the past few weeks. As I keep telling my kids, no one likes to be ignored.

UPDATE:  One broken toe, so we came home with a lot of tape and gauze for buddy taping, and a silly shoe to keep her foot stable.  We’re set now.  I’m pretty sure that, when I was a kid and broke my toes, we did nothing at all about it, but we live now in an age of wonders and miracles.  Hence the funky shoe.

9 Responses

  1. You made me think of this interesting website I read about in Classroom Connect or some other educational journal.

    PBS did a series on “Do You Speak American?” and created an extensive website to compliment the series.

    Since I am from Long Island originally,and now live in VA, I particularly enjoyed reading about how it is not necessarily my accent, but my whole style of speaking that can be perceived as off-putting. Here is the link to an article by Deborah Tannen that the website reprinted: http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/newyorkcity/accent/

    One of the other articles specifically mentions NY speech patterns in relation to CA speech patterns.

    Just found this interesting and am curious where your conversation partners were from originally.

  2. Good question, Diane. Siblings, from the same household. The non-stop talker is female, the non-stop interrupter is male. Incidentally, Deborah Tannen long ago wrote that men and women interrupt about the same number of times, but do so differently. Women tend to interrupt to join the conversational flow; men tend to interrupt to cut it off, and redirect it to a conversational flow of their choice. The interrupter here was a very manly man.

  3. I am living proof that the “eat less, exercise more” rule can’t beat back genetics. No matter that I’m eating well, and exercising regularly, I can’t change the genetic destiny that says that, now that I’ve had children, I’ll have my mother’s figure and never again be rail thin. Sigh….

    Partially it is a metabolism thing.

    To store up fatty stores for the big bad winter or something now that there is a family that must be fed. No fatty deposits of energy probably meant that the mother would fall over dead during times of starvation, drought, or disaster back in the Day.

    Speaking of genetic destiny, do you think it can be genetic destiny to break your toes? I broke most of my toes when I was young in various accidents where I slammed into walls and stairs.

    I have never broken a bone in my body. What my calcium intake early on, I can’t really say what the state of my bones are. I always try and walk around with shoes on when doing activities, so that’s one problem. Without armor, even strong tissues break.

  4. BW, I seem to recall you are diligent in providing fresh fruits and veggies for your family’s diet, but check your pantry for high fructose corn syrup in the ingredients of your processed food. The stuff deranges the metabolism and puts the body in starvation mode, ie. the body lowers it’s metabolic rate to conserve supposedly scarce food as what? FAT!!
    It is actually better to sweeten with a small amount of real sugar that high fructose corn syrup. Check the labels and eliminate the HFCS. It should help.
    As far a broken bones are concerned, it’s fate. People who break one bone seem to be more likely to break one again than the general population. Ymarsakar is right. Make sure your little one wears shoes.
    Al

  5. I’m with you on that, Al, and have, in fact cut out most sweeteners of any type from my diet — which is why the flatlining is all the more frustrating, because I miss my sweets!

  6. I suspect you might be over-analyzing grandly: the kid failed to watch where she was going and took a step somewhat longer than the tread would permit, that’s all. This is called an “accident,” probably owing to a moment’s inattention.

    Accidents happen; that is their nature. (Though on a somewhat unrelated side-note, the word “accident” is evidently not in the dictionary of police agencies in Washington State. A couple of weeks ago some poor old guy driving along in Tacoma had a heart attack, and crashed his car. After they got him to the hospital, as God is my witness, they cited him for “driving while distracted!”)

    But kids are kids and bones are bones, and occasionally the twain collide. Generally the bone loses, but they were designed with that in mind: they heal. If it’s anything other than a big toe, forget the doctor, who will be disinclined to do much about it anyway.

  7. I’m with you on that, Al, and have, in fact cut out most sweeteners of any type from my diet — which is why the flatlining is all the more frustrating, because I miss my sweets!

    Comment by Bookworm | July 17, 2007

    Stress is also a one of those bad influences on metabolism.

    The stuff deranges the metabolism and puts the body in starvation mode, ie. the body lowers it’s metabolic rate to conserve supposedly scarce food as what? FAT!!

    Fatty meats and whatevers taste very good when I’m hungry. And the more I exercise, the hungrier I get. Even the hunger pangs increase in pain levels. But I don’t do anything and thereby lower my metabolism, fatty foods no longer taste all that good.

    I call it a self-modulating metabolism.

  8. If I don’t do anything.

  9. Sandals aren’t shoes in my view, just for the record.

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